Berliner Symposium Integrated Palliative Cancer Care

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Post by Nadine Persaud, BSW, MSW, RSW, PhD Candidate (Quelle)

I was recently asked to define palliative care in one short sentence, and I very quickly responded by saying; palliative care supports individuals with life-limiting illnesses to live well until they die. I strongly believe that living and dying go hand-in-hand. When we are able to view death in this way, we are able to grieve and better celebrate lives. The depiction of death in the media is mostly associated with fictional characters such as the grim-reaper. I often look at these depictions and wonder, when will this change. When will our death-denying society make a shift to becoming more accepting of the one journey that we all have in common. When will we live in a society where the death process is celebrated the same way we celebrate birth. When will we live in a society where words such as loss, gone and passed away are replaced with the word died.

 

When I think of palliative care, I think of hope. I think of meaning. I think of purpose. I think of resilience. And most importantly, I think of life. We all have a duty and that duty is to help breakdown all of the myths associated with death. We all have the opportunity to improve the provision of palliative care not only within our society but also around the world. We have exceptional palliative care services in parts of the world and not so much in other parts of the world. Our job is to band together and create a world where there is equity within our palliative care system. I challenge as many people as possible to use their voices as their biggest asset and speak out about palliative care and about hospice care and what we can do as a collaborate group to change the way in which death is viewed. Death is difficult, death is hard, death is permanent but death is also a legacy of a life lived. It is our job to celebrate that life and carry on the legacy of those we love and care for.